New Release Tuesday – October 7

October 3rd, 2014

Against the Wild

American Horror Story Season 3

Bates Motel Season 2

Edge of Tomorrow

Million Dollar Arm

My Dog the Champion

Obvious Child

Sleeping Beauty (Diamond Edition)

Tasting Menu

Vikings Season 2

When Calls the Heart: a telling silence

When Calls the Heart: lost & found

When Calls the Heart: the dance

The Foreign Films New to View Oct 14

September 30th, 2014
 

The Foreign Films New to View newsletter is a monthly publication designed to keep you up to date on some of HCPL's latest foreign films on DVD. The selections in this newsletter are just a sample of the rich variety of films available to you through your library. Use the sign-up box above to have this newsletter sent directly to your e-mail every month, with new, recommended movies for you to view. See the Foreign Films New to View Archive for selections from back issues:  http://blogs.hcplonline.org/avblog/index.php/category/foreign-films/.


Bullett Raja, directed by Tigmanshu Dhulia

(In Hindi, with English subtitles)

With a running time of well over two hours, one should expect a lot of action in this buddy film about gangsters and corruption in India.  Raja is our very cool eponymous hero, who befriends Rudra at a wedding during a shootout, yes, a shootout.  From there, the two take off, blasting guns and fighting corruption or engaging in corruption, whichever  – I must admit that I lost track during the movie.  Then along comes Mitaali, beautiful and flirty, who falls for our hero.  Does he have room in his heart for a woman, with all that buddy loyalty thing going on?  I'm not sure, although does it really matter?  Great fun and, yes, lots of action.  Dhulia also directed Paan Singh Tomar, a Bollywood drama owned by HCPL.

 

The Damned, directed by René Clément

(In French, with English subtitles)

If you like war movies, this older film is a gem.  Just as Berlin is falling in 1945, only days before Hitler will commit suicide, several Nazi officials and collaborators flee in a submarine from Oslo, headed for South America, where they will set up an on-going front to the war.  A quirk of fate thrusts an innocent French physician on board as well, who is there just to care for the ill and then to be disposed of when this gang of thugs reaches its destination.  The movie was filmed almost entirely in the sub, and not surprisingly the form of the movie enhances the content, as tensions mount, submerged hatreds boil to the surface, and the pressures of the cramped quarters along with pent up rage and bitterness exlode.  The film includes historical footage from the war, which adds to the grim story, and its gritty black-and-white cinematography reflects the darkness of the characters.  HCPL has a number of DVDs directed by René Clément, including Forbidden Games, Gervaise, and Purple Noon.

 

 

The French Minister, directed by Bertrand Tavernier

(In French, with English subtitles)

Pity poor Arthur Vlaminck, the new speech writer at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, working directly under the Foreign Minister himself, the stately, imposing Alexandre Taillard de Worms.  Alexandre is given to abstractions when he articulates his thoughts but would prefer that his speech writer capture his ideas and make them concrete, no small task considering that his ideas can be summed up in language such as, "Legitimacy!  Unity! Efficacy!"  Huh?  On the Foreign Minister's commando team of writers, researchers, and attachés, Arthur has an ally in the person of  calm and collected Claude Maupas, a kind of spin doctor/permanent secretary.  One gets the sense that Claude has seen it all and been through it all before.   He can offer Arthur some advice and even consoling words, but it is Arthur who must wade through Alexandre's abstractions to more concrete substance.  If you favor subtlety and wit in your comedies, this is for you.  Tavernier also directed The Clockmaker and The Princess of Montpensier, owned by HCPL.

 

Manakamana, directed by Stephanie Spray and Pacho Velez

(In Nepalese, with English subtitles)

One of the most fascinating documentaries I've seen this year, Manakamana is a film for those with discerning tastes.  The premise is simple:  film subjects on their ride in a gondola lift up and down a mountain in Nepal as they visit a temple to the goddess Bhagwati.  They are confined passengers for about eight or nine minutes on this breathtaking journey over ravines and forests and up the steep slopes, as a stationary camera films them during the ride.  Sometimes the people talk; sometimes they are silent; sometimes they remark on the view or the shortness now of this once-long journey, sometimes they eat ice cream.  They laugh, they talk, they look in wonder at the sights below.  We the viewers are granted the privilege of riding with them, observing their expressions, listening to their comments or their silence, hearing the whisper of the mountain wind, seeing with the passengers the changes in the landscape below as the modern world encroaches on what used to be their known world.  The slow pace may not be for everyone, but for those of us who long for a few moments of quiet thought, this is a movie for us.

 

The Missing Picture, directed by Rithy Panh

(In French, with English subtitles)

This is a most unusual and striking documentary, not just because of the compelling story it depicts but also because of the format.  Rithy Panh created clay figures, not animated as in claymation but used in a stationary setting to create dioramas to tell the story, set by set, scene by scene, of his family's sufferings under the rule of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia in the 1970's.  Almost childlike in form, the figures nevertheless draw our sympathy and prick our conscience that the world did not do more to end this brutal reign of terror sooner.  The director intersperses his dioramas with propaganda footage from the Cambodian archives, allowing us to see the real-life faces of the people of a sad nation during that nightmare of Cambodian history.

  

The Rocket, directed by Kim Mordaunt

(In Thai, with English subtitles)

Ahlo, a Laotian boy, from his inauspicious birth through his first ten years, seems to be trailed by bad luck.  His very birth as a twin is itself a sign of bad luck, as even his twin brother is born dead.  His mother defies tradition and keeps the remaining live infant, despite strong, persuasive arguments from his grandmother.  As Ahlo grows, he does indeed seem to bring bad luck to his family and community.  Or maybe he just happens to be in the wrong village, designated for destruction when a new dam is built, at the wrong time.  Once his family makes the mandatory move to a dismal camp for all the displaced citizens, the struggles begin anew.  But Rocket is a hopeful movie, even funny at times, as Ahlo grows into a lively and creative child, bent on misadventure and occasional rebellion, but ultimately a good kid.  His challenge is to find a way to get enough money for his family to buy some farmland and start afresh.  One way is to enter the annual rocket contest in a nearby village to see if he can win the grand prize.  With the help of a former collaborator with the U. S. Army, and with lots of daring-do, he risks all to produce a frighteningly effective rocket, all for the love of his family.

 

 

Sister, directed by Ursula Meier

(In French, with English subtitles)

We have to keep in mind that 12-year-old Simon and his older sister Louise are just two kids, alone in the world, trying to survive.  Then we can sympathize with Simon, the little thief, who spends his days stealing expensive ski equipment from the prosperous tourists on the slopes of the western Alps.  Sometimes Louise works; more often than not she quits her jobs in anger over some slight or other, so Simon's job as a thief is what really keeps them alive. He steals food from backpacks, skis from unsuspecting tourists, and just about anything else he can lift.  Occasionally he is caught and suffers a beating or a severe scolding.  Occasionally Louise leaves him to spend time with one boyfriend or another.  But always the two of them are in great need, barely knowing how to take care of themselves or each other.  As despairing as all of this sounds – a movie about the invisible poor – it does contain a ray of hope that the two will survive to adulthood and live a better life than what is there for them now. Ursula Meier also directed Home, owned by HCPL

 

 Two Lives, directed by George Maas and Judith Kaufmann

(In Norwegian and German, with English subtitles)

Katrine is a woman living in Norway in the early 1990's, happily married to the handsome Bjarte, an intrigal part of an intergenerational family, with daughter, grandchild, and mother.  Although her origins are full of sorrow, she is brimming with joy now.  Her mother was part of the Nazi Lebensborn program in the 1930's that focused on producing children with Germans in an effort to create a master race.  Katrine's mother's relationship with a German officer was a love match, but Katrine was still taken away as a baby by the Nazis and raised in Germany.  Well after the war, she escaped from East Germany and made her way back to Norway, found her mother, and started her life.  But something is amiss and always has been.  Katrine may not be who she appears to be after all. She travels periodically to East Germany, disguises herself with a wig and sunglasses, and checks files in dark government basements.  She meets unsavory Stasi types, and she flashes back to a chase in the Norwegian woods years ago that seems to be a key to a dark past.  A story of spies and identity theft, Two Lives holds mystery and intrigue for viewers.  Co-director Judith Kaufmann also directed Vivere, owned by HCPL.

 

When I Saw You, directed by Annemarie Jacir

(In Arabic, with English subtitles)

After the Six-Day War in Palestine, thousands of Palestinians found themselves in Jordanian refugee camps, separated from family, community,  and land.  The young Tarek and his mother Ghaydaa are two of those many faces.  Tarek's father departed in another convoy and is now hopelessly lost to them.  His mother is willing to wait for her husband, searching every newly arrived truck of refugees, but Tarek is determined to make his way back to his home. This is the story of his journey.  He sets off on his own, with his mother not far behind, frantically searching for him.  The story may be soft on the Palestinian militias, whom Tarek meets on his journey, but I think we are seeing them more through Tarek's childish eyes.  When his mother catches up with him, she also finds refuge in the mountain militia camp, but their stay there is only temporary, as Tarek heads for the border, Ghaydaa right behind him, the view of their homeland within grasp.

 
To view past editions of the newsletter, see Foreign Films Archives.        



New Release Tuesday – September 30

September 26th, 2014

Are You Here?

Leprechaun: Origins

Mentalist Season 6

Mike and Molly Season 4

R.L. Stine’s Mostly Ghostly

Sniper Legacy

Space Station 76

Third Person

Transformers

24: live another day

Wild Life

New Release Tuesday – September 23

September 23rd, 2014

Firestorm

Scandal Season 3

Very Good Girls

New Release Tuesday – September 16

September 15th, 2014

Alpha House Season 1

Arrow Season 2

Big Bang Theory Season 7

Bones Season 9

Castle Season 6

CSI Season 14

DCI Banks Season 2

Fault In Our Stars

Friend 2 – the legacy

German Doctor
Godzilla

Grimm Season 3

Hawaii Five-O Season 4

Ilo Ilo

Petals on the Wind

Prisoners of War Season 2

Roosevelets

Scott  & Bailey Season 2

Sleepy Hollow Season 1

Think Like a Man Too

New Release Tuesday – September 9

September 8th, 2014

Bee People

Brick Mansions

Captain America: the winter soldier

Doc McStuffins – School of Medicine

Fed Up

God’s Pocket

Goldbergs Season 1

Haunted House 2

Homeland Season 3

Hornet’s Nest
Long Way Down

Louder Than Words

Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Operation Maneater

Regular Show – Rigby Pack

Sex in the Wild

Supernatural Season 9

Vampire Diaries Season 5

Words and Pictures

New Release Tuesday – September 2

August 29th, 2014

Chicago Fire, Season 2

Chicago P.D., Season 1

Draft Day

Duck Dynasty: Quack or Treat

From the Rough

Grey’s Anatomy, Season 10

History Detective: Special Investigations

It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, Season 2

The League, Season 5

Line of Duty, Series 2

Moms’ Night Out

The New Girl, Season 3

Night Moves

Person of Interest, Season 3

They Came Together

Foreign Films New to View Sept 14

August 29th, 2014

Bethlehem, directed by Yuval Adler

(In Hebrew, with English subtitles)

Sanfur is a Palestinian teenager, who is working as an informant for the Israelis, under the supervision of Razi, an Israeli operative.  The relationship is complex, revolving around Sanfur’s brother, Ibrahim, an active militant now in hiding.  Sanfur and Razi like each other, but neither trusts the other very much.  Young and a bit naive, Sanfur is maybe just looking for a better life for himself and his parents.  Razi wants Ibrahim though and will employ whatever methods necessary to secure Ibrahim’s capture.  He wants to live in peace and safety, but so does Sanfur.  When Ibrahim does get cornered by the Israelis, Sanfur feels tremendous guilt.  There might be a way to make up for his slip, but the lure of living in a safe Israel as opposed to the oppressive West Bank is also at work here. His choices in these matters are dire, if he really does have any choices.

 

Bicycling with Moliere, directed by Philippe le Guay

(In French, with English subtitles)

Gauthier, a mediocre soap opera star, would like to revive Moliere’s The Misanthrope and can think of no better actor for a major role than Serge, an old acquaintance from acting days long gone by.  Serge, however, wants no part in the scheme.  He prefers living alone on a small island off the coast of France, stewing silently over the annoyances and evils of humankind.  But if he did accept, he would want to play Alceste, the lead.  Well, so would Gauthier, who hesitates to rehearse the less meaty part of Philinte.  They reach an agreement to rehearse alternating roles, and off they go, reciting the lines in Alexandrine verse, allowing the audience to share in a rare performance of this classic play…well, at least part of Act I.  Serge begins to pull out of his disagreeable funk, and Gauthier seems to be taking acting more seriously as the rehearsals progress.  Then along comes the disagreeable Francesca, an Italian woman in the midst of a nasty divorce, and the dynamics shift yet again.  Will Francesca, showing her lively and happier side, be able to move Serge away from his misanthropic view of the world?  Or will humankind live down to Serge’s expectations?   With both comedy and drama, the movie propels us along to our own conclusions. Philippe le Guay also directedThe Women on the 6th Floorcurrently owned by HCPL.

 

Capitaldirected by Costa-Gavras

 (In French, with English subtitles)

The director of the political thriller Z, also owned by HCPL, presents here an indictment of free-wheeling capitalism, the kind where behind closed doors, boards of directors hash out how to save money by laying off employees, while increasing their own bounty through various legal and illegal schemes.  The film follows Marc Tourneuil, who has risen through the ranks of the French Phoenix Bank.  Now he runs the bank but comes head to head with Dittmar Rigule, a hedge fund manager, who wants to own the bank to swell his own coffers.  Which character is more evil is hard to pinpoint, promising the viewer at least some satisfaction no matter what the outcome of the story. 

 

Children Without a Shadow, directed by Bernard Balteau

(In French, with English subtitles)

With the invasion of Belgium by the German army in 1942, all Jews were in immediate peril.  But through a collaborative effort of the resistance and Jewish families, thousands of children were hidden in Belgian households for the duration of the war. This documentary presents the story of Shaul Harel, whose parents placed him in the safety of the resistance.  It wasn’t an easy or particularly happy time for the little boy, but Professor Harel recalls for us the joys as well as the sorrows of those years. The film takes us beyond World War II into the post-war days when Harel stayed in a home for refugee children until his permanent move to Israel.  He is reunited with some of his childhood buddies, who reminisce together.  He draws his family into the story as well, as his children and grandchildren see where he hid and meet his friends from days gone by.  While the documentary holds unbearable sadness, it shows the happiness as well, with the resilience of children blooming afresh in a savage world.

 

The Jewish Cardinal, directed by Ilan Duran Cohen

(In French, with English subtitles)

Jean-Marie Lustiger was a Jewish child who converted to Catholicism in his early teens, while hiding with a Christian family during the Second World War.  Sincere in his faith and strong in his embrace of Christianity, he nevertheless felt in his heart the tug of his heritage.  This drama based on his life focuses more on the church politics during the reign of Pope John Paul II than on Lustiger’s earlier childhood experiences.  John Paul took a liking to this sharp, intelligent priest and elevated him from bishop to archbishop of Paris, and finally appointed him a cardinal in 1983.  This may not seem like much of a narrative for a drama, but the story heats up when Carmelite nuns set up a charity hospital in Auschwitz, usurping for their own the horrors that Europe’s Jews endured there, shifting the emphasis of the Holocaust from Jew to Christian Pole.  The outrage was universal, and Cardinal Lustiger needed to use all of his persuasive skills to urge the Pope, himself a Pole, to move the nuns out, against the will of other anti-semitic Poles.  Tensions were high as Europe reeled from a vicious right-wing resurgence in the European church, with the Jewish Cardinal doing his best to restore a more gentle vision of love and charity.

  

Like Father, Like Son, directed by Kore-eda Hirokazu

(In Japanese, with English subtitles)

Ryota and Midori seem to be living an upper middle-class dream.  They want for nothing, and they plan the same for their little boy, Keita.  Then their life is turned upside down when administrators from the hospital where Keita was born reveal that a terrible mistake occurred six years earlier. Keita and another baby were switched at birth.  While they love Keita tremendously, they also want their own son, Ryosuke.  He, in contrast, has been raised by a far less prosperous family, although an intensely loving one.  Ryosuke has siblings, or rather Keita does now, but Ryosuke is used to the rough and tumble of his less organized but happier family.  Keita, on the other hand, is used to piano lessons and private schools, tutors, and all the special attention a wealthy only child might expect.  How the two families cope with this dilemma and finally confront it is a testament to love.  Hirokazu also directed Still WalkingNobody Knows, and  After Lifeall owned by HCPL.

 

 

Omar, directed by Hany Abu-Assad

(In Arabic, with English subtitles)

Omar is a baker by trade, living on the West Bank, trying to make a better life for himself, but the usual obstacles seem to get in his way:  the Israeli occupation for one and pressure to participate in terrorist acts for another.  Then a friend of his kills an Israeli soldier, and everything changes irrevocably.  When Omar gets caught and sent to prison for the crime, it seems at first that despite the torture and interrogation, he might have a chance for release and freedom. Then he makes one tiny mistake and finds himself entangled in a collaborative effort with the Israelis to seek out the real killer.  He thinks he can cleverly turn the tables on the Israeli security forces, but he may be in way over his head on this one.  In war, do you ever know who your real friends are?  Abu-Assad also directed Paradise Now and  Rana’s Wedding, owned by HPCL.

 

 On My Way, directed by Emmanuelle Bercot

(In French, with English subtitles)

Families can be complicated.  When Bettie finds out that the love of her life has taken up with a much younger woman, she has had enough.  She throws up her hands, abandons her failing restaurant (in the midst of dinner), and drives off into, well, not the sunset, but something like that.  Her long drive takes a side trip when her estranged daughter, Muriel, calls to ask her to take her son, Charly, to his grandfather’s house, while Muriel accepts a new position at work.  Bettie doesn’t know Charly’s grandfather, having never met her ex-son-in-law’s family, nor does she even know her own grandson that well.  But she recognizes an opportunity to deliver a peace offering in accepting the task. And then the adventure begins, with Bettie and the young Charly traveling around France on an excellent road trip, hanging out together, working through their own issues, and generally finding that while not all of life’s problems can be solved on the road, many of them do go away with time and distance.

 

Prisoners of War, Season 1, directed by Yorem Toledano, et al.

(In Hebrew, with English subtitles)

I found this Israeli TV series to be riveting.  Three soldiers were taken prisoner by Palestinians seventeen years earlier, but through careful and persistent negotiations by the Israeli government, two of them have finally been released.  The third is probably dead, having suffered a likely fatal blow during a torture session years before. The world to which the survivors return is far more complicated than they would want.  It isn’t just the ambivalent nature of their release that unsettles a nation:  most people are jubilant, but some are resentful that terrorists were released in the exchange.  The Israeli army needs also to interrogate the men intently on their years of captivity.  And to cap it off, their families are having maybe more difficulty than anyone could have anticipated, with the men so long absent now back in their lives.  And there are in fact many unanswered questions that linger and hang over the soldiers, making their fragile return even more difficult and problematic.  When Season 1 ends, the cliffhanger presented makes one long for Season 2, now on order at HCPL.

 

7 Boxes, directed by Juan Carlos Maneglia and Tana Schémbori

(In Spanish, with English subtitles)

Victor just wants to make a little money and maybe buy a TV set or a cool cell phone.  For now, he pushes a delivery cart in the market, looking for anyone who might need a load lifted and carted off.  When a shady butcher asks him to move seven wooden crates out of the butcher shop and keep them hidden for just a little while, the money offered is too much of a temptation. But then the boxes get stolen, and the butcher wants the boxes back, and Victor finds himself being pursued through the labyrinthine market of stalls and warehouses, all the while looking for his stolen cart and boxes.  Then he finds out what is in the boxes, and the game changes completely.  Life can be pretty dangerous in a Paraguayan marketplace.

   

New Release Tuesday – August 26

August 22nd, 2014

Belle -Blu-ray

Blandings Series 2

Blended

Criminal Minds Season 9

Elementary Season 2

Haven Season 4

Legends of Oz – Dorothy’s return

Lego Friends: friends are forever

Leslie Sansone Mix & Match Walk Blasters

Medieval Lives: birth, marriage, death

Portlandia Season 4

Revenge Season 3

The Double

Walking Dead Season 4

New Release Tuesday – August 19

August 15th, 2014

Amazing Spider Man 2

American Girl Isabelle Dances Into the Spotlight

Boardwalk Empire Season 4

Boxcar Children

Brony Tale

Fading Gigolo

Good Wife Season 5

Inside Combat Rescue – The Last Stand

The Millers Season 1

Mindy Project Season 2

NCIS Season 11

NCIS Los Angeles Season 5

Parenthood Season 5

Once Upon a Time Season 3

Only Lovers Left Alive

Parks and Recreation Season 6

Quiet Ones

Revolution Season 2

Rosemary’s Baby

Sabotage

Scooby Doo! Frankencreepy

When I Saw You